Stay tuned for annotations and additional entries.

Abrams, Judith Z. Judaism and Disability: Portrayals in Ancient Texts from the Tanach through the Bavli. Gallaudet U P, 1998.

Ackerman, Susan. “The Blind, the Lame, and the Barren Shall Not Come into the House.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 29–45. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_3.

Adams, Ellen, editor. Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other. Routledge, 2021.

Avalos, Hector. This Abled Body: Rethinking Disabilities in Biblical Studies. Brill, 2007.

Baden, Joel S. “The Nature of Barrenness in the Hebrew Bible.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 13–27. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_2.

Baker, Patricia, and Sarah Francis. “Rational Capacity and Incomplete Adults: The Mentally Impaired in Classical Antiquity.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, edited by Ellen Adams. Routledge, 2021.

Bell, Robert H. “Homer’s Humor: Laughter in the Iliad.” Humanitas, vol. 20, no. 1-2, 2007, pp. 96-117.

Bragg, Lois. Oedipus Boreais: The Aberrant Body in Old Icelandic Myth and Saga. Fairleigh Dickinson U P, 2004.

Brockliss, William. “Out of the Mix: (Dis)Ability, Intimacy, and the Homeric Poems.” The Classical World, vol. 113, no. 1, 2019, pp. 1-27, doi:10.1353/clw.2019.0075.

C., Akhila Vimal. “Performing Disability: Representation and Power in ‘Classical’ Indian Dance.” The Routledge Handbook of Disability Arts, Culture, and Media, edited by Bree Hadley and Donna McDonald, pp. 336-346. Routledge, 2018.

Carter, Warren. ““The Blind, Lame and Paralyzed” (John 5:3): John’s Gospel, Disability Studies, and Postcolonial Perspectives.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature. Palgrave Macmillan.

Chew, Kristina. “Teaching Classics and/as Disability Advocacy.” Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Culture, and Composition, vol. 15, no. 3, 2015, pp. 541-548.

Christensen, Joel. “Beautiful Bodies, Beautiful Minds: Some Applications of Disability Studies to Homer.” The Classical World, vol. 114, no. 4, 2021, pp. 365-393, doi:10.1353/clw.2021.0020.

Clark, Patricia A., and M. Lynn Rose. “Psychiatric Disability and the Galenic Medical Matrix”, pp. 45-72. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Collins, Adela Yarbro. “Paul’s Disability: The Thorn in His Flesh.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 165–83. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_11.

Draycott, Jane. Prosthetics and Assistive Technology in Ancient Greece and Rome. Cambridge U P, 2022 (forthcoming).

—. Prostheses in Antiquity. Routledge, 2018, doi:10.4324/9781351232395.

—. “Prostheses in Classical Antiquity: A Taxonomy.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, Edited by Ellen Adams, Routledge, 2021.

Edwards, Martha L. “Deaf and Dumb in Ancient Greece.” The Disability Studies Reader. Routledge, 1997.

Gevaert, Bert, and Christian Laes. “What’s in a Monster? Pliny the Elder, Teratology and Bodily Disability”, pp. 211-230. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Goodey, C.F. and M. Lynn Rose. “Disability History and Greco-Roman Antiquity,” The Oxford Handbook of Disability History, edited by Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen. Oxford U P, 2018, DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190234959.013.3.

—. “Mental States, Bodily Dispositions and Table Manners: A Guide to Reading ‘Intellectual’ Disability from Homer to Late Antiquity”, 17-44. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Gourevitch, Danielle. “The Handicapped Children in Rome: Current Studies and Perspectives.” Medicina Nei Secoli, vol. 18, no. 2, 2006, pp. 459-477.

Gourevitch, Danielle, and Gilles Demigneux. “Two Historical Case Histories of Acute Alcoholism in the Roman Empire”, pp. 73-87. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Gracer, Bonnie L. (2007) “What the Rabbis Heard,” Journal of Religion, Disability & Health, 10:3-4, 85-99, DOI: 10.1300/J095v10n03_07.

Graham, Emma-Jayne. “Disparate Lives or Disparate Deaths? Post-Mortem Treatment of the Body and the Articulation of Difference”, pp. 249–274. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

—. “Interactional Sensibilities: Bringing Ancient Disability Studies to its Archaeological Senses.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body: The Forgotten Other.  Edited by Ellen Adams, 2021.

Graumann, Lutz Alexander. “Monstrous Births and Retrospective Diagnosis: The Case of Hermaphrodites in Antiquity”, pp. 181-209. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Gulliver, Mike, and William J. Lyons. “Conceptualizing the Place of Deaf People in Ancient Israel: Suggestions from Deaf Space.” Journal of Biblical Literature, vol. 137, no. 3, 2018, pp. 537-553.

Hall, Edith. “The Immortal Forgotten Other Gang: Dwarf Cedalion, Lame Hephaestus, and Blind Orion.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, edited by Ellen Adams. Routledge, 2021.

Henning, Meghan R. Hell Hath No Fury: Gender, Disability, and the Invention of Damned Bodies in Early Christian Literature. Yale U P, 2021.

—. “In Sickness and in Health: Ancient “rituals of Truth” in the Greco-Roman World and 1 Peter.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature. , 2011.

Horn, Cornelia B. “A Nexus of Disability in Ancient Greek Miracle Stories: A Comparison of Accounts of Blindness from the Asklepieion in Epidauros and the Shrine of Thecla in Seleucia”, pp. 114-153. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Junior, Nyasha, and Jeremy Schipper. “Disability Studies and the Bible.” New Meanings for Ancient Texts, 2013.

Kelley, Nicole. “‘The Punishment of the Devil was Apparent in the Torment of the Human Body’: Epilepsy in Ancient Christianity.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, 2011.

Kiefer, Thomas Joseph. “Reason and Normative Embodiment in Plato’s Republic: On the Philosophical Creation of Disability.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 1, 1, Jan. 2014. https://doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v34i1.3319.

Laes, Christian. A Cultural History of Disability in Antiquity. Bloomsbury, 2022.

—. Disabilities and the Disabled in the Roman World: A Social and Cultural History. Cambridge U P, 2018, doi:10.1017/9781316678480.

—. Disability in Antiquity. Routledge, 2016, doi:10.4324/9781315625287.

—. “Silent History? Speech Impairment in Roman Antiquity”, pp. 145-180. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

—. “Silent Witnesses: Deaf-Mutes in Graeco-Roman Antiquity.” The Classical World, vol. 104, no. 4, 2011, pp. 451-473, doi:10.1353/clw.2011.0092

Laes, Christian, C.F. Goodey, and M. Lynn Rose. “Approaching Disabilities a Capite ad Calcem: Hidden Themes in Roman Antiquity,” pp. 1-15. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Laes, Christian, et al., editors. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies, a Capite Ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Lemos, T. M. “‘Like the Eunuch Who Does Not Beget’: Gender, Mutilation, and Negotiated Status in the Ancient Near East.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 47–66. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_4.

Lommel, Korneel v. “Heroes and Outcasts: Ambiguous Attitudes Towards Impaired and Disfigured Roman Veterans.” The Classical World, vol. 109, no. 1, 2015, pp. 91-117, doi:10.1353/clw.2015.0085.

Mahran, Heba, and Samar Mostafa Kamal. “Physical Disability in Old Kingdom Tomb Scenes.” Athens Journal of History, vol. 2, no. 3, July 2016, pp. 169–92. https://doi.org/10.30958/ajhis.2-3-2.

Melcher, Sarah J. “A Tale of Two Eunuchs: Isaiah 56:1–8 and Acts 8:26–40.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 117–28. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_8.

—. (2012) “Blemish and Perfection of the Body in the Priestly Literature and Deuteronomy,” Journal of Religion, Disability & Health, 16:1, 1-15, DOI: 10.1080/15228967.2012.645593.

Miles, M. “Segregated We Stand? The Mutilated Greeks’ Debate at Persepolis, 330 BC.” Disability & Society, vol. 18, no. 7, Dec. 2003, pp. 865–79. https://doi.org/10.1080/0968759032000127290.

Mitchell, Alexandre G. “Disparate Bodies in Ancient Artefacts: The Function of Caricature and Pathological Grotesques among Roman Terracotta Figurines”, pp. 275–297. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Morris, Alexandra F. “Let That Be Your Last Battlefield: Tutankhamun and Disability.” Athens Journal of History, vol. 6, no. 1, Jan. 2020, pp. 53–72. https://doi.org/10.30958/ajhis.6-1-3.

Moss, Candida R. (2012) “Christly Possession and Weakened Bodies: Reconsideration of the Function of Paul’s Thorn in the Flesh (2 Cor. 12:7–10),” Journal of Religion, Disability & Health, 16:4, 319-333, DOI: 10.1080/15228967.2012.731987.

Moss, Candida R., and Jeremy Schipper, editors. Disability Studies and Biblical Literature. Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, doi:10.1057/9781137001207.

Newman, Sara. “Hephaestus Represented: A Mêtis-Based Inquiry.” Disability and Art History from Antiquity to the Twenty-First Century, edited by Millett-Gallant, Ann, and Elizabeth Howie, Routledge, 2022.

Okuyama, Yoshiko. “Semiotics of Otherness in Japanese Mythology.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 1, 2017, https://dsq-sds.org/article/view/5380.

Olyan, Saul M. “The Ascription of Physical Disability as a Stigmatizing Strategy in Biblical Iconic Polemics.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 89–102. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_6.

Parsons, Mikeal C. “His Feet and Ankles Were Made Strong: Signs of Character in the Man Lame from Birth.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 151–64. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_10.

Penrose, Walter D. “The Discourse of Disability in Ancient Greece.” The Classical World, vol. 108, no. 4, 2015, pp. 499-523, doi:10.1353/clw.2015.0068.

Petridou, Georgia. “‘There Is a Pain – so Utter –’: Narrating Chronic Pain and Disability in Antiquity and Modernity.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, Edited By Ellen Adams, Routledge, 2021.

Raphael, Rebecca. “Whoring after Cripples: On the Intersection of Gender and Disability Imagery in Jeremiah.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 103–16. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_7.

Rose, Martha Lynn. The Staff of Oedipus: Transforming Disability in Ancient Greece. U of Michigan P, 2003, doi:10.3998/mpub.17745.

—. “Subordination: Women and Intellectual Disability in the Ancient Greek World.” The Routledge History of Disability, edited by Roy Hanes, Ivan Brown and Nancy E. Hansen, pp. 35-47. Routledge, 2018.

Samama, Évelyne. “A King Walking with Pain? On the Textual and Iconographical Images of Philip II and Other Wounded Kings”, pp. 231–248. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

Silverblank, Hannah, and Marchella Ward. “Why does Classical Reception Need Disability Studies?” Classical Receptions Journal, vol. 12, no. 4, 2020, pp. 502-530, doi:10.1093/crj/claa009.

Sneed, Debby. “Disability and Infanticide in Ancient Greece.” Hesperia, vol. 90, no. 4, 2021, pp. 747-772, doi:10.2972/hesperia.90.4.0747.

—. “The Architecture of Access: Ramps at Ancient Greek Healing Sanctuaries.” Antiquity, vol. 94, no. 376, 2020, pp. 1015-1029, doi:10.15184/aqy.2020.123.

Solevåg, Anna Rebecca. “Listening for the Voices of Two Disabled Girls in Early Christian Literature,” pp. 287-299. Children and Everyday Life in the Roman and Late Antique World, edited by Christian Laes and Ville Vuolanto, 2016, doi:10.4324/9781315568942.

—. Negotiating the Disabled Body: Representations of Disability in Early Christian Texts, Society of Biblical Literature, 2018.

—. “No Nuts? no Problem!” Biblical Interpretation, vol. 24, no. 1, 2016, pp. 81-99, doi:10.1163/15685152-00241p06.

—. “Zacchaeus in the Gospel of Luke: Comic Figure, Sinner, and Included “Other”.” Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, vol. 14, no. 2, 2020, pp. 225-240, doi:10.3828/jlcds.2020.12.

Stewart, David Tabb. “Sexual Disabilities in the Hebrew Bible.” Disability Studies and Biblical Literature, edited by Candida R. Moss and Jeremy Schipper, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 67–87. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137001207_5.

Trentin, Lisa. “Deformity in the Roman Imperial Court.” Greece and Rome, vol. 58, no. 2, 2011, pp. 195-208, doi:10.1017/S0017383511000143.

—. “Exploring Visual Impairment in Ancient Rome”, pp. 89-114. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies A Capite ad Calcem. Brill, 2013.

—. The Hunchback in Hellenistic and Roman Art. Bloomsbury, 2015, doi:10.5040/9781472555816.

Valentine, Katy E. “Reading the Slave Girl of Acts 16:16-18 in Light of Enslavement and Disability”. Biblical Interpretation 26.3 (2018): 352-368.

Watts-Belser, Julia. “Disability Studies in Jewish Culture in Late Antiquity: Gender, Body, and Violence Amidst Empire.” A Companion to Late Ancient Jews and Judaism; Third Century BCE to Seventh Century CE. Wiley-Blackwell, 2020.

Yarza de los Ríos, Alexander. “Abya Yala’s Disability: Weaving with the Thread and Breath of the Ancestors.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 4, 2022. https://doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v41i4.8445.