Stay tuned for annotations and additional entries.

Acker, Paul. “Dwarf-Lore in Alvíssmál.” The Poetic Edda. Edited by Paul Acker, and Carolyne Larrington. Routledge, 2002.

Bailey, Anne E. “The Female Condition: Gender and Deformity in High‐Medieval Miracle Narratives.” Gender & History, vol. 33, no. 2, 2021, pp. 427-447. doi:10.1111/1468-0424.12519.

—. “Miracle Children: Medieval Hagiography and Childhood Imperfection.” The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 47, no. 3, 2016;2017;, pp. 267-285. doi:10.1162/JINH_a_01012.

Baskin, Judith R. “‘She Extinguished the Light of the World’: Justifications for Women’s Disabilities in Abot de-Rabbi Nathan B”. Current Trends in the Study of Midrash, edited by Carol Bakhos. Brill, 2006.

Bragg, Lois. “From the Mute God to the Lesser God: Disability in Medieval Celtic and Old Norse Literature.” Disability & Society, vol. 12, no. 2, 1997, pp. 165-178, doi:10.1080/09687599727317.

Bruce Wallace, K. (2019). “Grendel and Goliath: Monstrous Superability and Disability in the Old English Corpus.” In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. The New Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan.

Buhrer, Eliza. “Disability and Consent in Medieval Law.” Postmedieval a Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies, vol. 10, no. 3, 2019, pp. 344-356, doi:10.1057/s41280-019-00136-w.

—. (2019). “’If in Other Respects He Appears to Be Effectively Human’: Defining Monstrosity in Medieval English Law.” In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Busse, Beatrix, and Annette Kern-Stähler. “Bleary Eyes: Middle English Constructions of Visual Disabilities”. The Five Senses in Medieval and Early Modern England. Brill, 2016.

Calabrese, Michael. “Disabling Pride in the Pricke of Conscience.” The Chaucer Review, vol. 53, no. 4, 2018, pp. 377-401.

Chace, Jessica. “Animal, Vegetable, Prosthesis: Medieval Care Networks in the Lives of Three English Saints.” Exemplaria, vol. 29, no. 1, 2017, pp. 1-20.

—. ““Semy-Vif for Sorow”: Disability and Tragedy in Troilus and Criseyde and the Tale of Beryn.” The Chaucer Review, vol. 56, no. 1, 2021, pp. 54-79.

Crocker, Christopher and Yoav Tirosh. “Health, Healing, and the Social Body in Medieval Iceland.” Understanding Disability Throughout History: Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Iceland from Settlement to 1936, edited by Hanna Björg Sigurjónsdóttir and James G. Rice, pp. 113-127. Routledge, 2021.

Crocker, Christopher, Yoav Tirosh, and Ármann Jakobsson. “Disability in Medieval Iceland: Some Methodological Concerns.” Understanding Disability Throughout History: Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Iceland from Settlement to 1936, edited by Hanna Björg Sigurjónsdóttir and James G. Rice, pp. 12-28. Routledge, 2021.

Deanda, Elena. “Speak in Silence: The Power of Weakness in the Works of Teresa De Cartagena.” Ehumanista, vol. 29, 2015, pp. 461-475.

Dillig, Janina. “‘Some Have it from Birth, Some by Disposition’: Foolishness in Medieval German Literature.” Intellectual Disability: A Conceptual Disability, 1200-1900, edited by Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey, and Tim Stainton, pp. 64-79. Manchester U P, 2018.

Ekholst, Christine. “The Value of a Thumb: Injuries and Disability in Swedish Medieval Law.” Mirator, vol. 20, no. 2, 2021, pp. 38-53.

Eyler, Joshua R., editor. Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations. Taylor and Francis, 2016, doi:10.4324/9781315577388.

Fossier, Arnaud. “The Body of the Priest: Eunuchs in Western Canon Law and the Medieval Catholic Church.” The Catholic Historical Review, vol. 106, no. 1, 2020, pp. 27-49.

Gianfalla, Jennifer M. “‘Ther is moore mysshapen amonges thise beggeres’: Discourses of Disability in Piers Plowman,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited ByJoshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

Gleeson, Brendan. “The Social Space of Disability in Feudal England.” Geographies of Disability, Routledge, 1999, pp. 81–105, https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203021217-12.

Godden, Richard H. “Neighboring Disability in Medieval Literature.” Exemplaria, vol. 32, no. 3, 2020, pp. 229–47, https://doi.org/10.1080/10412573.2020.1854997.

—. “Prosthetic Ecologies: Vulnerable Bodies and the Dismodern Subject in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Textual Practice, vol. 30, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1273-1290.

Goodison, Natalie, Deborah J. G. Mackay, and I. K. Temple. “Genetics, Molar Pregnancies and Medieval Ideas of Monstrous Births: The Lump of Flesh in The King of Tars.” Medical Humanities, vol. 45, no. 1, 2019, pp. 2. doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011387.

Guerra, Francesca. “Simplifying Access: Metadata for Medieval Disability Studies.” PNLA Quarterly, vol. 74, no. 2, 2010, pp. 10-26.

Hernigou, Philippe. “Crutch Art Painting in The Middle Age as Orthopaedic Heritage (Part I: The Lepers, The Poliomyelitis, The Cripples).” International Orthopaedics, 38(6), pp. 1329–1335 (2014). doi: 10.1007/s00264-013-2266-x.

—. “Crutch Art Painting in The Middle Age as Orthopaedic Heritage (Part II: The Peg Leg, The Bent-Knee Peg and The Beggar).” International Orthopaedics, 38(7): 1535–1542 (2014). doi: 10.1007/s00264-014-2278-1.

Higl, Andrew. “Henryson’s Textual and Narrative Prosthesis onto Chaucer’s Corpus: Cresseid’s Leprosy and Her Schort Conclusioun,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

Hsy, Jonathan. “Diverging Forms: Disability and the Monk’s Tales.” pp. 85–98. Chaucer and the Subversion of Form, edited by Thomas A. Prendergast and Jessica Rosenfeld. Cambridge U P, 2018, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108147682.005.

—. “Symptom and Surface: Disruptive Deafness and Medieval Medical Authority.” Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, vol. 13, no. 4, 2016, pp. 477-483, doi:10.1007/s11673-016-9744-y.

Kim, Yonsoo. “Teresa De Cartagena’s Illness and Disability as Embodied Knowledge.” Romanic Review, vol. 113, no. 1, 2022, pp. 131-149.

Kuuliala, Jenni. Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages: Constructions of Impairments in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Canonization Processes. Brepols, 2016.

—. “Disability and Religious Practices in Late Medieval Prussia: Infirmity and the Miraculous in the Canonization Process of St. Dorothea of Montau (1404–1406)”. Tracing Hospital Boundaries: Integration and Segregation in Southeastern Europe and Beyond, 1050-1970, edited by Jane L. Stevens Crawshaw, Irena Benyovsky Latin, and Kathleen Vongsathorn, pp. 46–74. Brill, 2020.

—. “Physical Disability and Bodily Difference”. A Companion to Medieval Miracle Collections, edited by Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, Jenni Kuuliala, and Iona McCleery. Brill, 2021.

—. Saints, Infirmity, and Community in the Late Middle Ages. Amsterdam U P, 2020.

Lawless, Catherine. “Patienthood in Medieval Tuscany: Beliefs and Cures.” Medical Humanities, vol. 42, no. 2, 2016, pp. 76. doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2015-010835.

Lewis, M. (2019). “Blob Child” Revisited: Conflations of Monstrosity, Disability, and Race in King of Tars. In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Lund, Mary Ann. “Richard’s Back: Death, Scoliosis and Myth Making.” Medical Humanities, vol. 41, no. 2, Apr. 2015.

McKinstry, Jamie. “Perpetual Bodily Trauma: Wounding and Memory in the Middle English Romances.” Medical Humanities, vol. 39, no. 1, 2013, pp. 59, doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2012-010199.

McNabb, Cameron H., et al. Medieval Disability Sourcebook. Edited by Cameron H. McNabb. punctum books, 2020, doi:10.21983/P3.0276.1.00.

Metzler, Irina. Disability in Medieval Europe: Thinking about Physical Impairment during the High Middle Ages c. 1100-1400. Routledge, 2006., doi:10.4324/9780203016060

—. “Disability in the Middle Ages: Impairment at the Intersection of Historical Inquiry and Disability Studies.” History Compass, vol. 9, no. 1, Jan. 2011, doi:10.1111/j.1478-0542.2010.00746.x.

—. Fools and Idiots?: Intellectual Disability in the Middle Ages. Manchester U P, 2016.

—. “Illogical Thinking: Problems Concerning Medieval Notions of ‘Idiocy’ and ‘Rationality.’” Logical Skills, Springer International, 2021, pp. 137–57, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-58446-7_8.

—. “Intellectual Disability in the European Middle Ages,” The Oxford Handbook of Disability History, edited by Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick, and Kim E. Nielsen. Oxford U P, 2018, DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190234959.013.4.

—. A Social History of Disability in the Middle Ages: Cultural Considerations of Physical Impairment. Taylor and Francis, 2013, doi:10.4324/9780203371169.

—. “‘Will-Nots’ and ‘Cannots’: Tracing a Trope in Medieval Thought.”Intellectual Disability: A Conceptual Disability, 1200-1900, edited by Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey, and Tim Stainton, pp. 45-63. Manchester U P, 2018.

Mian, Ali A. “Mental Disability in Medieval Hanafī Legalism.” Islamic Studies, vol. 51, no. 3, 2012, pp. 247-262.

Miles, M. (2002) “Some Historical Texts on Disability in the Classical Muslim World,” Journal of Religion, Disability & Health, 6:2-3, 77-88, DOI: 10.1300/J095v06n02_09.

Miller, Stephanie R. “Disability and Poverty at the Brancacci Chapel.” Disability and Art History from Antiquity to the Twenty-First Century, edited by Millett-Gallant, Ann, and Elizabeth Howie, Routledge, 2022.

Mock, Sean. “’Against a Dwarf’: The Medieval Motif of the Antagonistic Dwarf and its Role in Contemporary Literature and Film.” Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, vol. 14, no. 2, 2020, pp. 155-170, doi:10.3828/jlcds.2020.8.

Montroso, A.S. (2019). Dwelling Underground in The Book of John Mandeville: Monstrosity, Disability, Ecology. In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Neufeld, Christine M. “A Dwarf in King Arthur’s Court: Perceiving Disability in Arthurian Romance.” Arthuriana, vol. 25, no. 4, 2015, pp. 25-35, doi:10.1353/art.2015.0056.

O’Toole, Mark P. “Disability and the Suppression of Historical Identity: Rediscovering the Professional Backgrounds of the Blind Residents of the Hôpital des Quinze-Vingts,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

Orlemanski, Julie. “Literary Genre, Medieval Studies, and the Prosthesis of Disability.” Textual Practice, vol. 30, no. 7, 2016, pp. 1253-1272, doi:10.1080/0950236X.2016.1229907.

Parker, L.P. (2019). “Eschatology for Cannibals: A System of Aberrance in the Old English Andreas.” In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Parlopiano, Brandon. “Propter Deformitatem: Towards a Concept of Disability in Medieval Canon Law.” Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, vol. 4, no. 3, 2015, doi:10.15353/cjds.v4i3.232.

Pearman, Tory V. “Disability, Blood, and Liminality in Malory’s “Tale of the Sankgreal”.” Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, vol. 10, no. 3, 2016, pp. 271-286.

—. Disability and Knighthood in Malory’s Morte Darthur. Routledge, 2019/2018, doi:10.4324/9780429445453.

—. “O Sweete Venym Queynte!’: Pregnancy and the Disabled Female Body in the Merchant’s Tale,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

—. “Refiguring Disability: Deviance, Blinding, and the Supernatural in Thomas Chestre’S Sir Launfal.” Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, vol. 3, no. 2, 2009, pp. 131-146, doi:10.1353/jlc.0.0015.

—. Women and Disability in Medieval Literature. Palgrave Macmillian, 2010, doi:10.1057/9780230117563.

Pedersen, David. “Experiencing Authority: The Wife of Bath’s Deaf Ear and the Flawed Exegesis of St. Jerome.” Medieval Feminist Forum, vol. 55, no. 2, 2020, pp. 98-114, DOI:10.17077/1536-8742.2112.

  • Noting that scholars have paid markedly little attention of the Wife of Bath’s disability, Pedersen “attempts to attend to the deaf ear on its own terms. Rather than assuming that the Wife is tragic, comic, or heroic and then fitting the deafness into this reading, my goal is to unpack what the deaf ear might tell us in its own right about the Wife or her contribution to The Canterbury Tales. When the deafness is allowed to step into the spotlight, I believe it shifts focus from the character of the Wife herself to the misogyny of the medieval clerical culture, typified by St. Jerome’s Adversus Jovinianum, that deafened her to scripture… In other words, the deaf ear speaks to the often debated characterization of the Wife by suggesting that anything we find distasteful or upsetting about her is the fault of her misogynistic clerical teachers.”

Rajendran, S. (2019). E(race)ing the Future: Imagined Medieval Reproductive Possibilities and the Monstrosity of Power. In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Reibe, Nicole. (2018) “The Convent of the Infirmed: Teresa de Cartagena’s Religious Model of Disability,” Journal of Disability & Religion, 22:2, 130-145, DOI: 10.1080/23312521.2018.1453312.

Richardson, Kristina. Difference and Disability in the Medieval Islamic World: Blighted Bodies. Edinburgh U P, 2012, doi:10.3366/j.ctt3fgqv5.

—. “Domestic Violence in Medieval Disability Narratives.” International Journal of Middle East Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, 2019, pp. 113-115, doi:10.1017/S0020743818001198.

Robinson, Carol L. “Go Ask Alisoun: Geoffrey Chaucer and Deafland (Deafness as Authority).” Literature Compass, vol. 15, no. 6, 2018, pp. e12454-n/a.

Rogers, Will. Writing Old Age and Impairments in Late Medieval England, Arc Humanities P, 2021.

Sayers, Edna Edith. “Experience, Authority, and the Mediation of Deafness: Chaucer’s Wife of Bath,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

Sayers, William. “Kingship and the Hero’s Flaw: Disfigurement as Ideological Vehicle in Early Irish Narrative.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, 1997, https://dsq-sds.org/.

Scarborough, Connie L. Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts: Disgraced Or Graced. Amsterdam U P, 2018, doi:10.5040/9789048551231.

Schattner, Angela. “Disabled to Work? Impairment, the in/ability to Work and Perceptions of dis/ability in Late Medieval and Early Modern Germany.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 4, 2017, https://dsq-sds.org/article/view/6105.

Sexton, John P. “Difference and Disability: On the Logic of Naming in the Icelandic Sagas,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

Singer, Julie. “Able-Bodied Fragility.” Digital Philology, vol. 9, no. 1, 2020, pp. 47-68, doi:10.1353/dph.2020.0003.

—. “Disability and the Social Body.” Postmedieval: A Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies, vol. 3, no. 2, 2012, pp. 135-141, doi:10.1057/pmed.2012.15.

—. “Lyrical Humor(s) in the ‘Fumeur” Songs,’ The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies, edited by Blake Howe, Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, Neil Lerner, and Joseph Straus. Oxford U P, 2015, DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199331444.013.26.

—. “Playing by Ear: Compensation, Reclamation, and Prosthesis in Fourteenth-Century Song,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler. Routledge 2010.

—. “Toward a Transhuman Model of Medieval Disability.” Postmedieval: A Journal of Medieval Cultural Studies, vol. 1, no. 1-2, 2010, pp. 173-179, doi:10.1057/pmed.2009.4.

Skinner, Patricia. Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, doi:10.1057/978-1-137-54439-1.

Skoda, Hannah. “Representations of Disability in the Thirteenth-Century Miracles de Saint Louis,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler, Routledge, 2010.

Sprunger, David A. “Depicting the Insane: A Thirteenth-Century Case Study.” In Marvels, Monsters, and Miracles: Studies in the Medieval and Early Modern Imaginations, edited by Timothy S. Jones and David A. Sprunger. Western Michigan U P, 2002.

Steel, K. (2019). “Muteness and Disembodied Difference: Three Case Studies.” In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Swenson, H. (2019). “Attending to “Beasts Irrational” in Gower’s Visio Anglie.” In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Tirosh, Yoav. “Deafness and Nonspeaking in Late Medieval Iceland (1200–1550).” Viator, vol. 51, no. 1, 2020, pp. 311-344, doi:10.1484/J.VIATOR.5.127050.

Tovey, Beth. “Kingly Impairments in Anglo-Saxon Literature: God’s Curse and God’s Blessing,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler, Routledge, 2010.

Tracy, Kisha G. “Representations of Disability: The Medieval Literary Tradition of the Fisher King,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler, Routledge, 2010.

Turner, Wendy J. “Conceptualization of Intellectual Disability in Medieval English Law.” Intellectual Disability: A Conceptual Disability, 1200-1900, edited by Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey, and Tim Stainton, pp. 26-44. Manchester U P, 2018.

Verner, Lisa. “Medieval monsters, in theory and practice.” Medicina nei secoli 26 1 (2014): 43-68.

Wallace, Leslie V. “The Role of Dwarfs in Tang Postmortem Elite Life.” Disability and Art History from Antiquity to the Twenty-First Century, edited by Millett-Gallant, Ann, and Elizabeth Howie, Routledge, 2022.

Weinreich, S.J. (2019). “How a Monster Means: The Significance of Bodily Difference in the Christopher Cynocephalus Tradition.” In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. Palgrave Macmillan.

Weiskott, Eric. “Cumulative Revision in John Gower’s Quicquid Homo Scribat.” English Studies, vol. 103, no. 4, 2022, pp. 547-554.

  • Weiskott “reads revision in Quicquid homo scribat between Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of the rhizome and Julie Singer’s concept of lyric prosthesis.” The author considers the revisions to “John Gower’s twice-revised short Latin poem on his blindness” in terms of compulsion and proposes “understand[ing] the text on the page as a prosthesis constructed to enable the author to confront difficult circumstances” (from abstract).

Wells, Scott. “The Exemplary Blindness of Francis of Assisi,” Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, edited by Joshua R. Eyler, Routledge, 2010.

Wheatley, Edward. “Monsters, Saints, and Sinners: Disability in Medieval Literature.” The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Disability, edited by Clare Barker and Stuart Murray, Cambridge U P, 2018, pp. 17–31.

—. “A River Runs through it: Disability, Homosexuality, Queered/Disabled Discourse, and the Isle of Blandie in Bérinus.” Exemplaria, vol. 19, no. 3, 2007, pp. 386-401, doi:10.1179/175330707X237267.

—. Stumbling Blocks before the Blind: Medieval Constructions of a Disability. U of Michigan P, 2010, doi:10.3998/mpub.915892.

Williams, Scott M. Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. Taylor and Francis, 2020, https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429202919.
Willits, Catherine. “The Obfuscation of Bodily Sight in the Showings of Julian of Norwich.” Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, vol. 8, no. 1, 2014, pp. 81-96, doi:10.3828/jlcds.2014.6.