Stay tuned for annotations and additional entries.

Adams, Ellen. “New Light on ‘the Viewer’: Sensing the Parthenon Galleries in the British Museum.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, edited by Ellen Adams. Routledge, 2021.

Cachia, Amanda. “Disability Aesthetics: A Pedagogy for Teaching a Revisionist Art History.” Sex, Identity, Aesthetics: The Work of Tobin Siebers and Disability Studies, edited by Jina B. Kim et al., U of Michigan P, 2021, pp. 161–72.

Chace, Jessica. “Diagnostic Medievalism: The Case of Leprosy’s Stigma.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 39, no. 3, 3, Aug. 2019. https://doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v39i3.6410.

Coker, Lauren. “Masquerading Early Modern Disability: Sexuality, Violence, and the Body (Politic) in Richard III.” Screen Bodies, vol. 3, no. 1, 2018, pp. 98-108.

  • Inspired by Katherine Schaap Williams’s reading Richard III’s rhetorical and performative use of disability in Shakespeare’s play, Coker examines how Sir Ian McKellen’s Richard employs masquerade to use disability to his advantage in Richard Loncraine’s 1995 film adaptation. Coker attends to the roles of aggression and sexuality in the film and concludes that “the first half of the film features Richard masquerading ability, while the second half features him masquerading disability.” (abstract)

Davidson, Michael. “The Rage of Caliban: Disabling Bodies in Modernist Aesthetics.” Modernism/modernity, vol. 22, no. 4, 2015, pp. 609-625.

Donnelly, Colleen Elaine. “Re-Visioning Negative Archetypes of Disability and Deformity in Fantasy: Wicked, Maleficent, and Game of Thrones.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 4, 4, Dec. 2016. https://doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v36i4.5313.

Dunn, L.C. (2020). Shakespearean Disability Theatre. In: Dunn, L.C. (eds) Performing Disability in Early Modern English Drama. Palgrave Macmillan.

Escolme, Bridget. “Ophelia Confined: Madness and Infantilisation in Some Versions of Hamlet.” Performance, Madness and Psychiatry: Isolated Acts, edited by Anna Harpin and Juliet Foster, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, pp. 165–86.

Goggins, Sophie. “Displaying the Forgotten Other in Museums: Prostheses at National Museums Scotland.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, edited by Ellen Adams, Routledge, 2021.

Graham, Emma-Jayne. “Interactional Sensibilities: Bringing Ancient Disability Studies to Its Archaeological Senses.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, edited by Ellen Adams. Routledge, 2021.

Hughes, Bill. “Disabled People as Counterfeit Citizens: The Politics of Resentment Past and Present.” Disability & Society, vol. 30, no. 7, Aug. 2015, pp. 991–1004. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2015.1066664.

King, Helen. “A History of Our Own?: Using Classics in Disability Histories.” Disability Studies and the Classical Body, edited by Ellen Adams. Routledge, 2021.

Kostihová, Marcela. “Richard Recast: Renaissance Disability in a Postcommunist Culture.” Recovering Disability in Early Modern England. Ohio State UP, 2013.

Leonard, Kendra P. “Music for Olivier’s Richard III: Cinematic Scoring for the Early Modern Monstrous.” The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies. Edited by Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, et al. Oxford U P, 2015.

Long, K.P. (2019). From Monstrosity to Postnormality: Montaigne, Canguilhem, Foucault. In: Godden, R., Mittman, A. (eds) Monstrosity, Disability, and the Posthuman in the Medieval and Early Modern World. The New Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan.

Lubet, Alex, and Ingrid C. Hofmann. “Classical Music, Disability, & Film: A Pedagogical Script.” Disability Studies Quarterly, vol. 26, no. 1, 2006.

McCarthy, Grace. Shakespearean Drama, Disability, and the Filmic Stare. Taylor and Francis, 2021, https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003163374.

O’Reilly, Kaite, and Phillip Zarrilli. “An Irreverent Richard III Redux: [Re]Cripping the Crip.” Playfulness in Shakespearean Adaptations, edited by Marina Gerzic and Aidan Norrie. Routledge, 2020.

Olive, S. (2020). “This Is Miching Mallecho. It Means Mischief”: Problematizing Representations of Actors with Down’s Syndrome in Growing Up Down’s. In: Dunn, L.C. (eds) Performing Disability in Early Modern English Drama. Palgrave Macmillan.

Ott, Katherine. “Collective Bodies: What Museums Do for Disability Studies.” In Re-Presenting Disability: Activism and Agency in the Museum, edited by Richard Sandell, Jocelyn Dodd, and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, 269–79. Routledge, 2010.

Peghinelli, Andrea. “‘And Thus I Clothe My Naked Villainy’: Richard III and the Deformed Body as Rhetorical Camouflage in Thomas Ostermeier’s Production.” Shakespeare Bulletin: The Journal of Early Modern Drama in Performance, vol. 39, no. 1, 2021, pp. 93–107. DOI: 10.1353/shb.2021.0014.